Stonecutter

July 19, 2018 | Professional Profiles |

These craftsmen, following in the footsteps of cathedral builders, are artists. This profession looks back on a rich history and places great emphasis on tradition. Nevertheless, this profession requires a knowledge of the most up-to-date technological developments.

As an artist who works on buildings, this craftsman is capable of working stone from the quarry in order to achieve the shape visualised in his or her head, making use of sketches and templates. In this way, he or she is able to produce windowsills, frames, ledges, cornices, ceiling slabs, stairs, stair landings, fireplace cladding, tombs, works of art, stone walls, etc. He or she uses traditional tools like hammer and chisel for finishing, installing, and plastering, but laser technology is also being used in the industry now, offering a wonderful tool for cleaning old stone.

In this way, he or she is able to produce windowsills, frames, ledges, cornices, ceiling slabs, stairs, stair landings, fireplace cladding, tombs, works of art, stone walls, etc.

Whether it’s for a new construction or the restoration of a cultural heritage site – professional stonecutters are highly sought after on the job market. This is a profession that allows advancement to team leader, site manager, foreman, or company director. One might even imagine getting a job as a technician in a planning office or working freelance as a skilled artisan.

The minimum requirements for this profession include an apprenticeship ending with the reception of a vocational aptitude diploma (DAP) and successful completion of 9e classes in secondary school. The three-year training period takes place within the context of an apprenticeship contract.

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